Jean-Baptiste Vincent

MPS
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I am a planetary scientist at the Max Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung (Solar System Research), located in Göttingen, Germany (Curriculum Vitae).

My work is oriented towards the understanding of surface properties and activity of small bodies in our solar system. These objects are currently interpreted as remnants from the early age of our Solar System, and the bricks from which planets, water, and life may have been formed. Remote and in-situ observations, however, only give us access to their current surface, which has been heavily processed for billions of years. Understanding this evolution and the physical processes responsible is the key to decipher the formation and evolution of the Solar System.

Dust jets of comet 67P
Dust jets of comet 67P
(Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)
Close view of asteroid (21) Lutetia
Close view of asteroid (21) Lutetia
(Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

As a Co-I and coordinator of the research group “Activity & Jets” in the OSIRIS team (ESA's Rosetta mission), and Associate Scientist with NASA’s Dawn mission, I have direct access to a wealth of in situ observations of asteroids and comets. My analysis of these data sets has already led to new views on crater morphology and physical properties of the surface material. I have developed a numerical model describing the release of cometary dust and gas jets. This code and its results have been actively used for the planning of the mission Stardust/Next and the planning and data analysis of the Rosetta mission. My work on comets and asteroids is now merging into the study of the Main Belt Comets/Active asteroids, a new family of small bodies.

Contact

Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung
Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3
37077 Göttingen, Germany
Office Number: BT2-E3-118
Tel: +49-551-384-979-539
mail: vincent[at]mps.mpg.de